The 90 Miles Mystery Box: Episode #1532 — 90 Miles From Tyranny

You have come across a mystery box. But what is inside? It could be literally anything from the serene to the horrific, from the beautiful to the repugnant, from the mysterious to the familiar.If you decide to open it, you could be disappointed, you could be inspired, you could be appalled. This is not for the faint of heart or…

The 90 Miles Mystery Box: Episode #1532 — 90 Miles From Tyranny

Word from the Dark Side – Cemetery Gates, sexy syringes, South Stasiland, stone the emus and stooge the censors — SovietMen

Cemetery Gates by Pantera, 1990 American FDA approves vaccines for kids: [Committee] members include a former vice president of Pfizer Vaccines, a recent Pfizer consultant, a recent Pfizer research grant recipient, a man who mentored a current top Pfizer vaccine executive, a man who runs a center that gives out Pfizer vaccines, the chair of […]

Word from the Dark Side – Cemetery Gates, sexy syringes, South Stasiland, stone the emus and stooge the censors — SovietMen

Has Evidenced-Based Medicine Ever Really Been A Thing?

https://www.propublica.org/article/when-evidence-says-no-but-doctors-say-yes

“Just do the surgery. None of us are going to be upset with you for doing the surgery. Your bank account’s not going to be upset with you for doing the surgery. Just do the surgery.”

And the stent procedure was a classic example of the latter. In 2012, Brown had coauthored a paper that examined every randomized clinical trial that compared stent implantation with more conservative forms of treatment, and he found that stents for stable patients prevent zero heart attacks and extend the lives of patients a grand total of not at all. In general, Brown says, “nobody that’s not having a heart attack needs a stent.” (Brown added that stents may improve chest pain in some patients, albeit fleetingly.) Nonetheless, hundreds of thousands of stable patients receive stents annually, and one in 50 will suffer a serious complication or die as a result of the implantation procedure.

AT THE SAME TIME, patients and even doctors themselves are sometimes unsure of just how effective common treatments are, or how to appropriately measure and express such things. Graham Walker, an emergency physician in San Francisco, co-runs a website staffed by doctor volunteers called the NNT that helps doctors and patients understand how impactful drugs are — and often are not. “NNT” is an abbreviation for “number needed to treat,” as in: How many patients need to be treated with a drug or procedure for one patient to get the hoped-for benefit? In almost all popular media, the effects of a drug are reported by relative risk reduction. To use a fictional illness, for example, say you hear on the radio that a drug reduces your risk of dying from Hogwart’s disease by 20 percent, which sounds pretty good. Except, that means if 10 in 1,000 people who get Hogwart’s disease normally die from it, and every single patient goes on the drug, eight in 1,000 will die from Hogwart’s disease. So, for every 500 patients who get the drug, one will be spared death by Hogwart’s disease. Hence, the NNT is 500. That might sound fine, but if the drug’s “NNH” — “number needed to harm” — is, say, 20 and the unwanted side effect is severe, then 25 patients suffer serious harm for each one who is saved. Suddenly, the trade-off looks grim.

A very long, but VERY interesting article. Basically, there is little reason to trust that the medications prescribed or procedures being pushed on you will help you personally at all, and actually good reason to believe they might in fact harm you.

Gosh it kinda reminds me of something being pushed real hard on us right now…

Diet, exercise, sleep and general healthy lifestyle will do more, MUCH MORE for you personally than an entire pharmacy’s worth of pills.

We’ve Had Lots Of Dumb Presidents

“Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.” President Calvin Coolidge

Now there is such a thing as dumb luck, but dumb people don’t build spaceships and travel to the moon or send probes to Mars no matter how persistent they might be.

How many might trees have been felled with a herring, Cal? Maybe your third attempt at Swamp Castle stayed up, but a talented man wouldn’t build a castle in the swamp in the first place.